111 Texts and Meaning
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
An introduction to the study of the structures and methods by which texts create and convey meaning. Although texts and approaches will be determined by the individual instructors, all sections will emphasize reflective, critical reading, as well as text-centered discussions and written assignments. 4 credits.

150 Interpretive Strategies
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
The course addresses issues specific to literary and cultural analysis and in the process explores various interpretive strategies through which ideas of the literary and of literary study are engaged. The perspectives examined will vary according to instructor. Students will read primary theoretical texts, and will write about how theories of literature might inform ways of reading prose, poetry, drama, and/or film. 4 credits.

210 Advanced Composition
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Instruction and practice in writing, analyzing, and evaluating narrative, descriptive, expository, and argumentative essays. 4 credits.

211 Professional Communication
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The course refines students’ grammar, mechanics, and style; develops analytical and collaborative skills; introduces the strategies, formats, and organizational patterns of a variety of professional letters, memos, proposals, and reports; teaches research strategies and techniques; and develops oral and nonverbal communication skills. 4 credits.

212 Journalism: Principles and Practice
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The course addresses the role of newspapers in society, the strategies for reporting and writing news, and the ethical and legal ramifications of newspaper reporting. 4 credits.

213 Investigative Reporting
Completion of an investigative project for publication, including choosing an area of study, interviewing and assembling and retention of pertinent documents. Revelatory reporting will be written, packaged with photographs and graphics and published. May Experience ONLY. 2 credits.

215 Writing for Film and Television
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Conducted as a workshop on how to write feature films and various types of television drama scripts, this course develops skills used in dramatic writing for visual media, with special focus on film and television. 4 credits.

220 Writing Poems
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The course will develop students’ proficiency in the craft of poetry. Students should be eager to write frequently, to read carefully, and to comment thoughtfully upon the work of other poets – including their classmates. 4 credits.

221 Writing Fiction
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The course will develop students’ proficiency in the craft of prose fiction. Students should be eager to write frequently, to read carefully, and to comment thoughtfully upon the stories of other authors – including their classmates. 4 credits.

223 Writing Nonfiction
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar This course will develop students’ proficiency in the craft of nonfiction. Students will do writing exercises, discuss published work, explore prose techniques, and critique their classmates’ work. 4 credits.

225 Writing with Writers
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Supervised by a prominent writer, students will work on their own creative projects. The genre (prose fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry) will change from year to year. May Experience ONLY. 2 credits.

227 Making Comics!: Form + Craft = Product
In Making Comics!: Form + Craft = Product, you will do just that; you will make comics. In doing so, you will learn how the peculiar art form of comics (or sequential art, or graphic novel) uses both image and text but ultimately operates in ways that differ from either prose or single-image pieces of art. It is the conjunction of the image and the text that make comics do what they do, so in order to understand that, you will write and you will make the images for at least four book projects. No art or writing pre-requisites are required, though you may be best-served if you have some level of skill in each. The course is not intended to teach you to write or teach you to draw; rather, the intention is to teach you how to combine those two medium for the purpose of dynamic storytelling. May Experience ONLY. 2 credits.

301 Literature of the Later Fourteenth Century
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of literature by the poets and mystics of Ricardian England, with an emphasis on interpreting these texts in light of their medieval social and philosophical context. A substantial part of this course is devoted to Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. 4 credits.

302 Literature of Early Modern Britain
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: Any first year writing seminar
A study of literature written during the reigns of the Tudors and the early Stuart monarchs when England began to develop a distinct cultural identity. Emphasis is on poetry and prose. 4 credits.

303 Early Modern Drama
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Major works from the golden age of English drama. Shakespeare and/or Shakespeare along with work by his contemporaries, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Middleton, Ford, and others. 4 credits.

304 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
A survey of English literature and culture from the Restoration of Charles II in 1660 to around 1800, covering a wide range of literary genres, such as Restoration drama, satiric poetry, the travel narrative, the periodical essay, and the novel. The course examines the historical, social, political, and intellectual backgrounds for these texts, such as the declining influence of court culture, the construction of a colonial market economy, discourses of slavery and abolition, and the reevaluation of traditional class and gender hierarchies. Authors studied include Rochester, Wycherley, Behn, Haywood, Aubin, Defoe, Pope, Swift, Fielding, Equiano, and others. 4 credits.

305 British Romantic Literature
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
A study of the major writers and some less well-known figures from the period 1790-1830: the poets Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P. B. Shelley, and Keats; the novelists Austen and Scott; the essayists Hazlitt, Lamb, and De Quincey; and others, such as Mary Shelley, Godwin, and Clare. Students will also engage the critical writing of the period as well as relevant current critical and theoretical issues. 4 credits.

306 Victorian Literature and Culture
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of Victorian fiction, poetry, and prose with an emphasis on major social, cultural, and political concerns and debates in nineteenth-century Britain: industrialization and modernization, ideologies of class and gender, evolutionary theory and religious ambivalence, new developments in aesthetic theory and literary form. Authors studied include Carlyle, Ruskin, Dickens, Eliot, Browning, Tennyson, Pater, Morris, and Wilde. 4 credits.

307 Literature Before Print
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The course explores the differences between the way medieval people read – their experience of reading and their training as interpreters of texts – and the way we read today, as well as the complexity and variance of texts created in a pre-print world. 4 credits.

309 Nature in South Asian Literature
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts) and WC (World Cultures)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Introduction to the genre of the pastoral as evidenced
in writings about South Asia, both by “Western” and “indigenous” authors either visiting or domiciled in the Indian subcontinent. An array of literary texts of different kinds written in different eras will be considered to help students understand the transformations in the genre (including its parody and subversion) in response to cultural and political developments. Secondary texts will also help construct an appropriate interpretive framework for the primary texts. 4 credits.

311 Studies in Fictional Histories
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
How does literature shape the ways in which one imagines historical figures, national events, or remote geographies? How do partially fictionalized reconstructions of experience influence historical understanding? This course theorizes the often porous borders between history and fiction. Students will examine archival material, historical documents, and theoretical studies alongside fictional works that do not simply reimagine the past but profoundly recast national histories.

311 Settling: Writing in America to 1830
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of American literature from the colonial period through Cooper, focusing on major works by Franklin, Brown, and Cooper, and considering such forms as the sermon, diary, captivity narrative, and spiritual biography. 4 credits.

312 Emerson to Dickinson
GER: UQ (Ultimate Questions)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of American literature from Emerson through Dickinson, focusing on such writers as Douglass, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Stowe, Whitman. Topics include the possibility of living well, relationships to creation, to God, to evil, and to an expanding, divided federation compromised by a constitution that allows slavery and disenfranchises women. 4 credits.

320 Eighteenth-Century Novel
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Novels are so familiar that it is hard to believe that there was ever at time when they did not exist. However, in Shakespeare’s day, there was not yet a novel in the modern sense, while a bit over a century later the novel was the most widely-read of non-religious literary forms. In this course we will explore the changes--in literacy, class structure, international relations, gender norms, print culture, language, and religion--that this new genre reflected. Authors covered may include Behn, Manley, Defoe, Haywood, Swift, Lennox, Fielding, Richardson, Collier, Burney, Goldsmith, Radcliffe, and Austen. 4 credits.

321 Victorian Novel
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The Victorian novel viewed through the lens of both nineteenth-century and modern theories of the novel. Works by Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Charlotte Bronte, Thomas Hardy and others will be examined from the perspective of Victorian literary culture. The work of critics such as Mikhail Bakhtin, Georg Lukacs, Walter Benjamin, Ian Watt, Fredric Jameson, and Franco Moretti will also be studied. 4 credits.

322 Modern British Novel: 1900-1960
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of the novel in the British Isles and Empire from 1900 to 1960. Focus on realism, modernism, colonialism, war, and social change. Major writers studied include Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Forster, Lawrence, Durrell, Greene, and Lessing. Readings will include literary history, criticism, and theory of the modern novel. 4 credits.

323 Global Novel since 1960
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The contemporary novel from the British Isles, the Caribbean, Canada, Australia, South Asia, and Africa. Focus on postmodernism, postcolonialism, and transnationalism from 1960 to the present. The writers studied include Naipaul, Rushdie, Ondaatje, Emecheta, Gordimer, McEwan, Atwood, Carey, and Kincaid. Readings will include theory and criticism. 4 credits.

325 Global Issues in Literature
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts) and WC (World Cultures)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of postcolonial responses to and re-authoring of different Western literary canons, including examples from drama, fiction and poetry. Study of literary practices from diverse postcolonial locations (Africa and the Caribbean) to enable understanding of how through literary adaptations and oppositional writings third world writers respond to writings from Europe and America. 4 credits.

331 American Novel from Its Beginnings to World War I
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Examination of the development of the American novel through its adaptations of such sub-genres as the Gothic novel, the historical romance, the social protest novel, the picaresque novel, the realistic novel of manners, and the naturalistic novel. Authors might include Cooper, Hawthorne, Stowe, James, Twain, Norris, Chopin, and Cather. 4 credits.

332 American Novel from World War I to the Present
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: Any first year writing seminar
Examination of modern and postmodern novels, emphasizing how these works reflect cultural assumptions about social class, race, ethnicity, gender roles, politics, technology, religion, art and entertainment. Authors might include Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Malamud, Kesey, Walker, and Tan. 4 credits.

335 Immersion Journalism
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of a fascinating branch of nonfiction writing. Texts may include works by Tom Wolfe, Barbara Ehrenreich, Edward Abbey, Karsten Heur and Susan Orlean. Students will read as writers, scour the texts for craft and style tactics and critique class members’ essays. 4 credits.

342 Modern British and American Drama
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of some of the powerful and varied work of recentdramatists, with attention to the conditions of the theatre of their time. Dramatists studied might include Shaw, Eliot, O’Neill, Miller, Wilder, Osborne, Arden, Pinter, Shaffer, Bolt, Orton, and Shepard. 4 credits.

343 Drama at Stratford
GER: VP (Visual and Performing Arts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Offered only as part of the Fall Term in England program. Study of the drama being performed in London and Stratford by the Royal Shakespeare Company, the National Theatre and others. 4 credits.

345 Travel Study in the British Isles
Texts and culture in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Specific topics will change from year to year. 4 credits.

351 Modern Poetry
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Works by at least a half-dozen prominent poets will be read, analyzed, and evaluated. Although prosody, poetic theory, and the development of modernism will be covered, major emphasis will be on the aesthetic qualities of individual poems and the distinctive sensibilities of individual poets. 4 credits.

352 Experimental Poetries
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Introduction to different kinds of British and American poetries and poetics of the twentieth century: some that reaffirm the well-known persona-centered lyric in various guises, and others that question the notions of expressivity and authenticity to redefine the lyric through a relatively more pronounced linguistic experimentation. 4 credits.

355 Religious Poetry in English
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Selected religious poets writing in English in the Christian tradition, from the seventeenth century to the present. Special attention to the function of metaphor in rendering religious experience. 4 credits.

361 History of the English Language
GER: HB (Empirical Study of Human Behavior)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Survey of the internal history of English, reviewing Indo-European and Germanic background and studying the development of phonology, morphology, and syntax from Old English to Modern English. 4 credits.

362 English Language: How it Works
GER: HB (Empirical Study of Human Behavior)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Introduction to basic English linguistics. The difference between prescriptive grammar (the rules we learn in school) and descriptive grammar (the linguistic rules that native speakers of a language have learned). Discussion of the main divisions of linguistics, focusing on the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Edited American English. Study of the ways other dialects, in particular, Southern American English and African American Vernacular English, differ from the standard and exploration of the implications of linguistics on social and educational policy. 4 credits.

369 Gender in South Asian Literature and Film
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts) and WC (World Cultures)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Introduction to the various debates over the representations of masculinity and femininity as these categories intersect with other forms of identity and belonging, such as caste/ class, nation, race, and sexuality through the reading of literary and filmic texts. 4 credits.

371 Mystery and Detective Fiction
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of mystery fiction and its offshoots (detective, suspense, spy) in English and translation. Possible writers: Shakespeare, Walpole, Poe, Hammett, Mankell. Critical perspectives may include narrative studies, gender criticism, Marxist criticism. 4 credits.

372 Studies in Short Fiction
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
This course considers the short story as a genre, beginning with its roots in fables, parables and fairy tales and tracing its development to the dynamic form we see in contemporary work. Students will read both American and international authors and discuss works on the basis of both thematic and formal qualities. 4 credits.

373 Fantasy and Science Fiction
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Exploration of how race, colonialism, gender, science, the sacred, and the human inform our fantasies about other worlds and times. May trace dialogue between contemporary fantasy/science fiction and literature of other periods. 4 credits.

374 Stardom and Identity
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Exploration of the historical development of the Hollywood star system and the complex role stars play in American film and culture, focusing on representative classic and contemporary film “stars,” and analyzing how stars are produced by the studio system and its remnants in the contemporary Hollywood dream factory and remade in the cultural imaginary. 4 credits.

375 Screening Film Noir
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Examination of distinctive stylistic and thematic features of film noir as it emerged in its classic period and as it returns in contemporary American cinema. The course will also consider the “noir anxiety” that emerges around identity as it relates to historical trauma, sexual roles, race and ethnicity and do so with an eye toward assessing the critical social commentary offered by both classic and contemporary noir cinema. 4 credits.

376 Shakespeare on Film and in Production
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of Shakespeare’s plays on film or in production if live performances occur during semester the course is taught. Shakespeare’s written texts may be studied, but focus will be on the artistry of the cinema or theater in revealing Shakespeare for modern audiences. 4 credits.

377 Studies in the Essay
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The essay as a genre, beginning with work from early practitioners such as Montaigne, Hazlitt, Lamb, and Shonagon, and tracing its development to the dynamic form we see in contemporary work. Students will read both American and international writers and discuss works on the basis of both thematic and formal qualities.

401 Studies in Chaucer
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The poetry of Chaucer, in Middle English, including some early poems, Troilus and Criseyde, and substantial selections from The Canterbury Tales. Special attention to the development of Chaucer’s narrative art, his invention of the Chaucerian persona, and his relevance to postmodern thought, conceived as his self-consciousness about the use of language and his ambivalence about the value of literary art. 4 credits.

403 Faulkner
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Chronological study of the development of Faulkner’s art from Flags in the Dust to Go Down, Moses. Attention paid to the concept of Yoknapatawpha County and to the various innovative narrative techniques Faulkner employed. 4 credits.

404 Major Figures in Early Modern British Literature
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of works written by major authors in the reigns of the Tudors and the Stuarts. Authors include Sidney, Spenser, Wroth, Marlowe, Jonson, Milton, or the major lyric poets. Focus on major works in their entirety written by single authors except in the case of the lyric poets. 4 credits.

405 Studies in Gothic Literature
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The course examines literature that evokes terror and horror, explores the possibility of supernatural forces, portrays mental disintegration, transgresses social, political, and moral norms, and exposes cultural anxieties and oppression. Topics and texts may vary. 4 credits.

408 Renaissance Epic
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The nature and purpose of the epic in the European Renaissance through a close study of Dante’s Divine Comedy, Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, Spenser’s Faerie Queene, and Milton’s Paradise Lost. Renaissance theories of allegory and genre and the cultural work of these epics are explored. 4 credits.

411 Satire
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Readings in satirical literature of all genres and many periods, with an emphasis on satire of the early eighteenth and the late twentieth centuries. Some attention to satire in forms other than literature. Focus on function, method, characteristics, and problems of the satirical mode. 4 credits.

412 Autobiographical Lives and Life
GER: UQ (Ultimate Questions)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Topics include spiritual and moral concerns contrast with other forms, such as biography and memoir, and specific sub-genres. Film adaptation or autobiographical film may also be considered. Alternating versions will include either an American emphasis or a global emphasis. 4 credits.

415 Studies in Contemporary American Literature
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Readings in American literature from 1950 to the present, with emphasis on what might make this recent writing different from what came before, or “postmodern” in terms of aesthetics and cultural context. May address fiction, drama and poetry or concentrate on a single genre. 4 credits.


416 Environmental Writing
GER: NE (Humans and the Natural Environment) and TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Focus on works commonly considered major examples of environmental writing and an examination of the theoretical/critical considerations involved in reading these works. Writers to be discussed include James Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, Mary Austin, Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson, and Barry Lopez. Theoretical problems such as the relation of writing to lived experience and the justice of emphasizing all life over human life will help focus discussions. 4 credits.

418 Shakespeare’s Europe/England’s Renaissance
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The influence of important classical and Renaissance European writers on the literature and drama of Shakespeare’s England. Topics vary, but may include the impact of authors such as Dante, Ovid, Montaigne, Petrarch, and others on Donne, Herbert, Marlowe, Milton, Shakespeare, Spenser, and their peers. 4 credits.

420 Animals in Medieval Literature and Culture
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar Explores medieval literature about animals, humans’ historical relationships with other animals, philosophical discussions of the idea of “the animal,” and connections between medieval views of animals and modern ecological issues. 4 credits.

421 Medieval Arthurian Literature
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of the earliest tales of King Arthur and his knights. Course focuses on medieval European literature but may include one contemporary version. Authors include Chrétien de Troyes, the Gawain poet, Malory, and others. 4 credits.

422 Literature of the South
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The dialogue about race, class, and gender that takes place between writers such as Faulkner, Warren, Gaines, Welty, O’Connor, Walker, and Alison. 4 credits.

423 Literature of the Irish Renaissance
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The remarkable literary flowering contemporary with the late nineteenth-century movements in Ireland that led to the creation of the Irish Free State in 1921, and with the difficult historical circumstances faced by the new nation in the first years of its existence. The major figures studied include Yeats, Joyce, Synge, and O’Casey. 4 credits.

434 What is Postcolonialism?
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts) and WC (World Cultures)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Introduction to the field of Postcolonial Studies through the study of literary, filmic, and theoretical texts focusing on the historical and ongoing interactions of European and non-European cultures from the perspective of domination, resistance, and the search for alternatives. 4 credits.

435 Writing Africa: Culture and Politics in African Literature
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts) and WC (World Cultures)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
A cross-genre survey of the literature of the African Continent. Attention will be paid to significant formal innovations and thematic preoccupations that define African literature. Exploring structures across literary and cultural boundaries like genre, race, gender, class and politics, in order to gain valuable insights into the relationship between literature and society, especially how texts participate in, and document the changing conditions of African societies. 4 credits.

451 Film Analysis
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Exploration of the fundamentals of film form: narrative construction in the Hollywood system as well as non- narrative formal systems (documentary, abstract and avant-garde film). Includes examination of the fundamentals of film style (mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, sound) and attention to the relationships between the literary and filmic texts. 4 credits.

452 Literary Feminisms
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Women’s literature in English as a distinct tradition, from the perspective of feminist literary theory and criticism. Structured as a historical and thematic survey of issues in the field; this course will vary in the writers and theorists studied. 4 credits.

453 Slave Narrative to Slave Novel
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar Traditional Black Atlantic eighteenth-and nineteenth- century slave narratives and examples from the twentieth- century “slave novel” or “neo-slave narrative,” taking into consideration the generic issues raised by the slave novel’s reinvention of the traditional slave narrative. Texts engage questions in critique of historiographies, ideologies, and models of interpretation; the relation between memory, writing, and historical representation; and the reproduction of hierarchical categories in the construction of racial, sexual, and gender differences. Authors might include Douglass, Equiano, Jacobs, Johnson, Morrison, Phillips, Keckley, and Butler. 4 credits.

454 Caribbean Cosmopolitanisms
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Reading across Caribbean literatures, cultures, languages, and theories which organize the region, exploring the ways in which cosmopolitanisms shape the literary and cultural productions of the Caribbean. Attention paid to the ways cultural hybridity emerges against the persistence of a mythological, cultural, and national homogeneity. Authors might include William Shakespeare, Charlotte Bronte, Michelle Cliff, Junot Diaz, Christina Diaz, Jamaica Kincaid, Earl Lovelace, and Jean Rhys. 4 credits.

455 Interpretive Issues in Early Modern Literature
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Study of key issues for understanding early modern British literature and its place in a history of ideas in the West. Topics include early modern literature in relation to the histories of science, individualism, gender and sexuality, privacy, literary criticism, authorship and/or the place of period texts in emerging theories of literature and history. 4 credits.

456 Comparative Ethnicities
GER: WC (World Cultures)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Emphasis on a comparative approach to Asian American, Jewish American, Native American, African American, Caribbean, US-Latino, and Chicano literatures. Focus will be on how writers of color address histories of ambivalent citizenship; how the immigrant experience and the return home changes both America and the world; the problematic concept of America itself, always seemingly at battle with itself. Some of the rhetorical battles waged over the meaning of an American national and hemispheric identity in the works of Gish Jen, Leslie Marmon Silko, Ralph Ellison, Maxine Hong Kingston, Sherman Alexie, Cristina Garcia, Junot Diaz, Philip Roth, and Edwidge Danticat, among others. 4 credits.

457 African American Drama
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
The history and development of African American drama in the United States from its origins to the present moment. Exploration of the roots of African American drama, the black theater of the Harlem Renaissance, the Little Theater Movement, and the Harlem Unit of the Federal Theater Project. A study of recent major plays from Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun to Suzan Lori-Park’s Topdog-Underdog. 4 credits.

461 Critical and Cultural Theory
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Introduction to theoretical approaches to literature, such as psychoanalysis, deconstruction, feminism, and postcolonial studies. Consideration of the ethics and politics of interpretation, the assumptions and practices informing theoretical work, and the relation between literature and theory. Readings include works of fiction, film, and texts by theorists such as Freud, Lacan, Kristeva, Zizek, Derrida, de Man, Butler, Cixous, Spivak, Bhabha. 4 credits.

462 The Stage, Social Struggle, and Theory
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Exploration of the way the theatre and drama become sites for producing social discourses and institutions. Focusing on one or more key periods in world drama, students will study the interrelations of plays, theoretical formulations, and specific material conditions of performance. 4 credits.

471 South Asian Cultural Studies: Literature and Film
GER: TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretation of Texts) and WC (World Cultures)
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
Introduction to the complex array of issues essential to understanding South Asian cultures in the contemporary context. Examining literary texts and films through interpretive approaches appropriate to the pluralistic cultural traditions of the region and informed by current debates in the humanities. 4 credits.

475 Senior Seminar in English
Prerequisite: any first year writing seminar
A seminar exploring a specific topic in literature, language, theory, and/or film. Students engage scholarship and research methodologies appropriate to the topic to produce an extensive and significant critical study. Designed for senior English majors. 4 credits.

501 Independent Study
Variable credit.

503 Individualized Internship
Prerequisite: instructor permission
Student will develop an internship to work at a business, agency or media site for approximately 210 hours over the term and will meet the objectives of a learning agreement completed with the employer and approved by a faculty sponsor. Requirements include a work journal, portfolios, and assigned academic papers relating to their internship. Open primarily to seniors and juniors. May not contribute to the major. Cannot be completed through the pass-no pass grading option. Not repeatable. Variable credit.

505 Structured Internship
Prerequisite: instructor permission
Students will develop internships at businesses, agencies, or media sites for approximately 210 hours over the term and will meet the objectives of a learning agreement completed with the employer and approved by a faculty sponsor. The internship site must permit the student a significant degree of professional writing. A weekly seminar class focuses on the objectives and issues of students’ experiences as they develop their verbal and written communication skills. Course requirements include a work journal, portfolios, and academic papers relating to their internship. The course is open primarily to seniors and juniors. The course may contribute to the major. Cannot be completed through the pass-no pass grading option. Not repeatable. Variable credit.

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