Christopher Blackwell grew up in Greenville, South Carolina, attending Stone School, League Middle School, and Greenville Sr. High School. He earned a B.A. in Classics, summa cum laude, from Marlboro College in Vermont, and a Ph.D. in Classics from Duke University. He has written books on ancient Greek history, classical Athenian democracy, and Alexander the Great. With his collaborator Neel Smith he is the developer of the CITE Architecture and Canonical Text Services, technologies for building scholarly digital libraries. With Neel Smith he is Project Architect of the Homer Multitext, a project of the Center for Hellenic Studies of Harvard University, Casey Dué and Mary Ebbott, edd.​

Name Title Description

CLS-111

Introduction to Classics

Introduction to the field of Classical Studies, focusing on philology, history, archaeology, art, and architecture and their sub-fields. Other topics include: the intellectual history of the discipline, transmission of texts, scholarly theory and methodology, and cultural informatics.

CLS-120

Mythology

Greek and Roman mythology. Topics include: definitions of myth, theory and interpretation of myth, the literary, historical and cultural context of Greek and Roman myths, and the principal ancient sources.

CLS-220

Greek Civilization

Chronological survey of Greek political, military, and economic history, development of literature, sculpture and major architecture; attention to domestic and religious aspects of the Greek experience.

CSC-270

Computational Humanities

Tools and techniques for creating, manipulating, and analyzing texts computationally. Intended for students of any discipline to provide competence and confidence in thinking about text and language in a digital environment.

FYW-1141

Homer and History

Follow the history of Homer's great war-poem, the Iliad, from the Bronze Age and the invention of writing, through the tyranny and democracy of Athens, the library of Alexandria, to its rescue from the ruins of Constantinople in the 1400s.

FYW-1293

Digitl Reading Digitl Writing

Does technology change the way we think about literature? Do we write differently when our text can be converted into interactive web sites or slide presentations as easily as it can be printed out? This seminar will raise these and similar broad questions through practical hands-on experience reading and writing with computers. Successful students will learn concepts from linguistics data science and literary studies as well as gaining broadly applicable technical skills.

GRK-110

Elementary Greek

Introduction to the fundamentals of fifth century Attic Greek. Topics include: pronunciation, basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax, practice in reading basic Greek. Material is adapted from classical texts and cultivates an appreciation of Greek literature and culture.

GRK-120

Elementary Greek II

Continuation of GRK-111. Topics include: continued study of vocabulary, grammar and syntax; reading more difficult Greek; gaining greater appreciation of Greek literature and culture.

GRK-201

Intermediate Greek

Reading and interpretation of writings from the Classical Greek authors and the Greek New Testament. Topics include new vocabulary, review of basic grammar and introduction of new grammar, guidance in translation and comprehension of moderately difficult Greek.

GRK-210

Greek New Testament

Selected readings from the Greek New Testament and other texts in koine Greek, with particular attention to the differences in idiom between Attic and koine Greek.

GRK-231

Greek Epic

Selected readings from Homer: Iliad or Odyssey. Attention is paid to differences between Epic and Attic idiom, poetic features (e.g. metrics, figures of speech), ancient scholarship on Homeric poetry, and the influence of Greek epic on later Western epic poetry. Course may be repeated once with change of author or topic.

GRK-233

Greek Prose

Readings from Herodotus, Plato, or Thucydides. Attention paid to advanced grammar, rapid comprehension, and scholarly interpretation of the text. Course may be repeated once with change of author or topic.

GRK-310

Greek New Testament

Selected readings from the Greek New Testament and other texts in koine Greek, with particular attention to the differences in idiom between Attic and koine Greek.

GRK-331

Greek Epic

Selected readings from Homer: Iliad or Odyssey. Attention is paid to differences between Epic and Attic idiom, poetic features (e.g. metrics, figures of speech), ancient scholarship on Homeric poetry, and the influence of Greek epic on later Western epic poetry. Course may be repeated once with change of author or topic.

GRK-332

Greek Drama

Readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, or Aristophanes. Attention paid to the evolution of Greek drama and the authors' places within that evolution. Course may be repeated once with a change of author or topic.

GRK-333

Greek Prose

Readings from Herodotus, Plato, or Thucydides. Attention paid to advanced grammar, rapid comprehension, and scholarly interpretation of the text. Course may be repeated once with change of author or topic.

HUM-450

Humanities Capstone Symposium

First semester of a year-long capstone experience for the Humanities Interdisciplinary Minor, meeting weekly. Rocus on advanced research methodologies and disciplinary practices in the Humanities, with presentations and readings that represent all Humanities departments.

MXP-215

Carolina History & Botany

An analysis of the work of the earliest European scientists to explore the Carolinas in the early 18th Century. It will be an engaged learning experience in history,botany, and image-based, computer assisted collaborative scholarship. May Experience ONLY.

I try to treat my students with respect. Working to learn new things, under criticism, in the presence of others takes courage. Coming to my class, at great expense, and trusting me to deliver something useful is an act of trust. I am grateful for the trust, and I honor the day-to-day courage.

  • ​Alester G. Furman, Jr. and Janie Earle Furman Award for Meritorious Teaching (Furman University)
  • 2008 Hall of Fame Award for Innovation in Education (The InnoVision Technology Awards, to promote technological innovation in Upstate South Carolina)
  • Silas Pearman Honorary Engaged Learning Award (Furman University)
Education
​​
Ph. D.
Duke University
B.A.
Marlboro College
​​

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