This is a list of courses offered by the Classics department, which fulfill requirements created by the university to allow students to acquire the breadth in educational experience which characterizes liberal education, develop intellectual discipline, discover their interests and build a foundation for specialization, students must successfully complete courses fulfilling a prescribed set of general education requirements.

FL (Foreign Language)

GRK-120 Elementary Greek II
For students seeking the Bachelor of Science degree ONLY
Prerequisite: GRK-110

Continuation of elementary Greek sequence. Topics include: continued study of vocabulary, grammar and syntax; reading more difficult Greek; gaining greater appreciation of Greek literature and culture. 4 credits.

GRK-201 Intermediate Greek
Prerequisite: GRK-120

Reading and interpretation of writings from the Classical Greek authors ad the Greek New Testament. Topics include new vocabulary, review of basic grammar and introduction of new grammar, guidance in translation and comprehension of moderately difficult Greek. 4 credits.

LTN-120 Elementary Latin II
For students seeking the Bachelor of Science degree ONLY
Prerequisite: LTN-110

Continuation of elementary Latin sequence. Topics include: continued study of vocabulary, grammar and syntax; reading more difficult Latin; gaining greater appreciation of Latin literature and culture. 4 credits.

LTN-201 Intermediate Latin I
Prerequisite: LTN-115 or 120

Reading and interpretation of writings by classical Latin authors. New vocabulary, review of basic grammar and introduction to new grammar, guidance in translation and comprehension of moderately difficult Latin. 4 credits.

LTN-202 Intermediate Latin II
Prerequisite: LTN-201

Builds upon the proficiency developed through first course in Intermediate Latin. Review of morphology, grammar, and syntax; reading of prose and poetry with the aim of developing proficiency in reading Latin and surveying Latin literature. 4 credits.

HA (Historical Analysis of Human Interactions)

CLS-111 Introduction to Classics

Introduction to the field of Classical Studies, focusing on philology, history, archaeology, art, and architecture along with their subfields. Other topics include: the intellectual history of the discipline, transmission of texts, scholarly theory and methodology, and cultural informatics. 4 credits.

CLS-211 Classical Archaeology

Illustrated lecture survey of the principal archaeological sites in Italy with emphasis on ancient Rome. The material culture and monumental remains and the developing styles in Roman art, architecture, and city planning. Examination of principal sites and monuments, as well as techniques and methods of excavation. 4 credits.

CLS-220 Greek Civilization

Chronological survey of Greek political, military, and economic history, development of literature, sculpture, and major architecture; attention to domestic and religious aspects of the Greek experience. 4 credits.

CLS-221 Roman Civilization

A study of Rome from its origins to its putative fall in the fifth century. Focus on the development and influence of Roman social, cultural, and political structures. 4 credits.

TA (Critical, Analytical Interpretations of Texts)

CLS-120 Mythology

Greek and Roman mythology. Topics include: definitions of myth, theory and interpretation of myth, the literary, historical and cultural context of Greek and Roman myths, and the principal ancient sources. 4 credits.

CLS-230 Reading Greek Literature

Survey in English translation of Greek literature including Homeric epic poems, Greek tragedy and comedy, and other significant genres. 4 credits.

CLS-231 Reading Latin Literature

Survey in English translation of Latin literature. topics include: a general survey of Latin literature and the concentrated reading and interpretation of selected works by authors such as Plautus, Caesar, Cicero, Catullus, Horace, Vergil, Livy, Seneca, and others. 4 credits.

GRK-210 Greek New Testament
Prerequisite: GRK-201

Selected readings from the Greek New Testament and other texts in Koine Greek, with particular attention to the differences in idiom between Attic and Koine Greek. 4 credits.

GRK-231 Greek Epic
Prerequisite: GRK-201

Selected readings from Homer: Iliad or Odyssey. Attention is paid to differences between Epic and Attic idiom, poetic features (e.g. metrics, figures of speech), ancient scholarship on Homeric poetry, and the influence of Greek epic on later Western epic poetry. Course may be repeated once with change of author or topic. 4 credits.

GRK-232 Greek Drama
Prerequisite: GRK-201

Readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, or Aristophanes. Attention paid to the evolution of Greek drama and the authors’ places within that evolution. Course may be repeated once with a change of author or topic. 4 credits.

GRK-233 Greek Prose
Prerequisite: GRK-201

Readings from Herodotus, Plato, or Thucydides. Attention paid to advanced grammar, rapid comprehension, and scholarly interpretation of the text. Course may be repeated once with change of author or topic. 4 credits.

LTN-220 Mediaeval and Renaissance Latin

Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance poetry and prose. Syntax of Medieval Latin, medieval thought, and the transmission of classical culture through the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance. Course may be repeated for credit based on change of topic. 4 credits.

LTN-231 Literature of the Roman Republic
Prerequisite: LTN-202

Readings from authors such as Catullus, Horace, Propertius, Tibullus, Ovid, or Vergil. Review and introduction to advanced grammar, style, meter, figures of speech, guidance in translation, comprehension, and scholarly interpretation of the text. Course may be repeated for credit based on change of topic. 4 credits.

LTN-232 Literature of the Augustan Age
Prerequisite: LTN-202

Reading of select comedies of Plautus and Terence. Grammar, meter, style, figures of speech, guidance in translation, comprehension, and scholarly interpretation of the text. Course may be repeated for credit based on change of topic. 4 credits.

LTN-233 Literature of the Roman Empire
Prerequisite: LTN-202

Readings from authors such as Caesar, Cicero, Livy, Pliny the Younger, Sallust and Seneca. Review and introduction to advanced grammar, guidance in translation, comprehension, and scholarly interpretation of texts. Course may be repeated for credit based on topic. 4 credits.

LTN-235 Studies in Advanced Latin
Prerequisite: LTN-202

Selected readings from genres such as satires, letters, or drama. Attention is paid to advanced grammar, rapid comprehension, and scholarly interpretation of the text. Course may be repeated once with a change of author. 4 credits.

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